A Kid’s Guide to the U.S. State Birds by MJJSales.com

States choose different symbols to represent them, including flowers and birds. Each state has a bird that serves as the symbol of the state. A state’s legislature (the lawmakers) usually choose a state bird, or sometimes a governor might choose the bird. Often, state birds live throughout the state in large numbers, but this is not always the case. States may sometimes choose a state bird because of its colors or because of a special song or call it makes. Sometimes, a bird has a special history in a state. For example, Utah chose its state bird, the California gull, because this bird was helpful to the first settlers of Utah when it ate all of the locusts that threatened their crops.

Some states allow hunting of their state bird, and other states do not allow a state bird to be hunted. Some states have also chosen a separate state game bird. State game birds are birds that hunters can find in the state. For example, the state of Georgia chose the brown thrasher as its state bird and the bobwhite quail as its state game bird.

The most popular state bird is the northern cardinal, with seven different states adopting this bird as their state symbol. The meadowlark is the second most popular state bird, with six states choosing this bird to represent them.

State Birds

  • Alabama’s state bird: Northern flicker
  • Alaska’s state bird: Willow ptarmigan
  • Arizona’s state bird: Cactus wren
  • Arkansas’ state bird: Northern mockingbird
  • California’s state bird: California quail
  • Colorado’s state bird: Lark bunting
  • Connecticut’s state bird: American robin
  • Delaware’s state bird: Delaware blue hen
  • Florida’s state bird: Northern mockingbird
  • Georgia’s state bird: Brown thrasher
  • Hawaii’s state bird: Hawaiian goose
  • Idaho’s state bird: Mountain bluebird
  • Illinois’ state bird: Northern cardinal
  • Indiana’s state bird: Northern cardinal
  • Iowa’s state bird: Eastern goldfinch
  • Kansas’ state bird: Western meadowlark
  • Kentucky’s state bird: Northern cardinal
  • Louisiana’s state bird: Brown pelican
  • Maine’s state bird: Black-capped chickadee
  • Maryland’s state bird: Baltimore oriole
  • Massachusetts’ state bird: Black-capped chickadee
  • Michigan’s state bird: American robin
  • Minnesota’s state bird: Common loon
  • Mississippi’s state bird: Northern mockingbird
  • Missouri’s state bird: Eastern bluebird
  • Montana’s state bird: Western meadowlark
  • Nebraska’s state bird: Western meadowlark
  • Nevada’s state bird: Mountain bluebird
  • New Hampshire’s state bird: Purple finch
  • New Jersey’s state bird: Eastern goldfinch
  • New Mexico’s state bird: Roadrunner
  • New York’s state bird: Eastern bluebird
  • North Carolina’s state bird: Northern cardinal
  • North Dakota’s state bird: Western meadowlark
  • Ohio’s state bird: Northern cardinal
  • Oklahoma’s state bird: Scissor-tailed flycatcher
  • Oregon’s state bird: Western meadowlark
  • Pennsylvania’s state bird: Ruffed grouse
  • Rhode Island’s state bird: Rhode Island red chicken
  • South Carolina’s state bird: Carolina wren
  • South Dakota’s state bird: Ring-necked pheasant
  • Tennessee’s state bird: Northern mockingbird
  • Texas’ state bird: Northern mockingbird
  • Utah’s state bird: California gull
  • Vermont’s state bird: Hermit thrush
  • Virginia’s state bird: Northern cardinal
  • Washington’s state bird: Willow goldfinch
  • West Virginia’s state bird: Northern cardinal
  • Wisconsin’s state bird: American robin
  • Wyoming’s state bird: Western meadowlark
  • District of Columbia’s state bird: Wood thrush
  • Guam’s state bird: Guam rail
  • Northern Mariana Islands’ state bird: Mariana fruit dove
  • Puerto Rico’s state bird: Puerto Rican spindalis
  • U.S. Virgin Islands’ state bird: Bananaquit

Resources

  • State Birds: Click on each state in this U.S. map to see the different state symbols, including state birds.
  • Alaska Kids’ Corner: The state of Alaska gives information about its state symbols, including its state bird, the willow ptarmigan. This bird changes color between summer and winter to match its surroundings.
  • Maine Kids: State Bird: Chickadee: Maine’s state bird is the black-capped chickadee, which lives throughout the state.
  • Maryland Kids Page: Maryland chose its state bird, the Baltimore oriole, in 1947.
  • Oklahoma State Symbols: The scissor-tailed flycatcher is Oklahoma’s state bird. This bird has a long, forked tail.
  • Animal Fact Sheet: Cactus Wren: The cactus wren lives in the deserts of Arizona, so this state legislature chose it as their state bird.
  • Louisiana Kids’ Page: This page lists the brown pelican as the Louisiana state bird.
  • Washington Fun Facts: The state of Washington chose the willow goldfinch as its state bird.
  • New Hampshire Almanac: State Bird: The purple finch lives in New Hampshire. The purple finch has been New Hampshire’s state bird since 1957.
  • California Quail: The California quail lives in brushy areas in California along the coast and in the foothills of the Sierra Nevadas.
  • Massachusetts Study Project: Massachusetts lists its state symbols. The list includes the black-capped chickadee, which is its state bird.
  • The Delaware Blue Hen: Fact and Fancy: Delaware’s state bird, the Delaware blue hen, is a breed of chicken that is an important part of its agricultural income.